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Viral bankruptcy: Today it’s Congress, Tomorrow the nation…and all I can think about is me, me, me

My congressman Brad Sherman voted “no” on the bill to keep America from falling into another Great Depression.

I think he’s got the right idea so I’m going to vote “no” on Brad Sherman come election day in hopes it keeps me from falling into chronic depression. After all, he’s wiping out my 401k, jeopardizing my tiny pension and my chances to get a job as a WalMart greeter to keep my house out of foreclosure.

Of course, I don’t even know who his Republican20080930.gif challenger is or even if there is one since how I vote — or you vote — doesn’t matter in California. All our congressional districts like our local and state districts have been gerrymandered to make sure that voting is irrelevant. Democracy works better that way for special interests and both parties prefer it nice and clean in that regard without interference from those troublemakers referred to in the Constitution as We the People.

I’m sure Brad’s vote was a matter of conscience just as it was a few years ago when I editorialized in the Daily News about his stooging on the China trade bill for that small minority with big clout called organized labor and he called me up and denounced me as an M-F.

I was cool then. I’m not so cool about pushing the nation to the brink of the worst economic crisis in nearly 80 years. Everybody hates the idea of bailing out the scoundrels who caused this financial disaster and profited from doing it, but I got a question for Brad and the 227 others.

What’s your plan to save the economy, the nation? And what about me?

“We’re told not to worry because this $700 billion
is not going to cost anything,” Sherman told reporters in Washington,
D.C. “Wall Street gets its money now, and we get it back never.”

Say what? You calling the President of the United States and the men who would succeed him — including your own favorite Barack Obama — liars?


Or maybe you’re the one having trouble with the truth.

So you can understand
his panic at the prospects of economic chaos and a long recession — or
worse. His whole re-election campaign was based on raising so much
money that he could scare off all serious challengers and avoid a
runoff in May when the massive budget deficit he created will be
visible for all to see. And now that budget hole is getting worse by
the hour.

But if the mayor carried a big political stick, he
could be the hero and all but single-handedly turn the House of
Representatives around.

That’s because eight of the “no” votes
on the bailout — the people he accuses of “partisan bickering” — are
Los Angeles area Democrats: Xavier Becerra, Grace F. Napolitano,
Lucille Roybal-Allard, Linda T. Sanchez, Adam Schiff, Brad Sherman,
Hilda L. Solis, Diane Watson.

Swing them and the vote is 220 to
213 — just four votes short of what’s needed to pass the bailout. If
the mayor can’t get to work and twist the arms of those eight, what
exactly can he do?

So you can understand
his panic at the prospects of economic chaos and a long recession — or
worse. His whole re-election campaign was based on raising so much
money that he could scare off all serious challengers and avoid a
runoff in May when the massive budget deficit he created will be
visible for all to see. And now that budget hole is getting worse by
the hour.

But if the mayor carried a big political stick, he
could be the hero and all but single-handedly turn the House of
Representatives around.

That’s because eight of the “no” votes
on the bailout — the people he accuses of “partisan bickering” — are
Los Angeles area Democrats: Xavier Becerra, Grace F. Napolitano,
Lucille Roybal-Allard, Linda T. Sanchez, Adam Schiff, Brad Sherman,
Hilda L. Solis, Diane Watson.

Swing them and the vote is 220 to
213 — just four votes short of what’s needed to pass the bailout. If
the mayor can’t get to work and twist the arms of those eight, what
exactly can he do?

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13 Responses to Viral bankruptcy: Today it’s Congress, Tomorrow the nation…and all I can think about is me, me, me

  1. Anonymous says:

    Hey, Ron, I love it.
    My advice in Sherman’s district is VOTE FOR HOROWITZ!!!! NEXT ELECTION. People will get to know him better – he is educated, intelligent and will give you folks what you need, a fair representation in your government. Not on party lines, but as what is fair, is fair.
    Speaking of fair representation in our governmewnt, people are disenfranchised every election because of the districting that divides us all into segments that favor one party or another. TH
    Between districting and no term limits, we have gang rule. Yes, we do.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Particularly galling are the phony populists on Capitol Hill (and elsewhere) who argue that this bailout favors Wall Street at the expense of Main Street.
    The idea that Main Street and Wall Street are separate is absurd, a ridiculous red herring. That should be readily apparent to anyone who’s ever gotten a business loan, home mortgage, bought public stock either directly or through their 401(k), or bought products from a business that accesses the public markets for short-term debt to stock inventory, pay vendors and make payroll.
    Main Street and Wall Street are inextricably linked, and anyone who argues otherwise is either intellectually dishonest, ignorant, or both.
    There’s no shortage of villains on Wall Street for this mess. There were bad actors on Main Street as well, including folks who bought homes that they knew were out of their price range.
    We’ll get to the recrimination and reform stage soon enough. There will be plenty of time to punish the bad guys. Right now, we should be working toward the common good of stabilizing the market.
    The bailout bill that failed yesterday was imperfect in many respects. But you’re asking the right question of those who voted ‘No’:
    Ok, you’ve killed this proposal… So now what’s your plan?

  3. by anonymous says:

    When reality slaps on the face it hurts but the illusion that everything was ok could not continue. The same goes with the bailout it will not solve the problem it will just delay it. Bailing out all these companies will have dire consequences. We cannot allow the depreciation of the dollar that would be more harmful to us. And that would be one of the effects of the bailout. Yes we will have to cut down in all our addictions of more, more and more. More toys, bigger houses, expensive vacations, the car of the year, new clothes etc. Our borrowing power will be limited. This experience will show us what is truly important in our live. We have to take time and look at this problem closely and not be rushed by fear.
    Main stream media feeds us illusions and attacks those that bring us the truth. People need to wake up and start questioning the truth behind this collapse and stop acting as sheepeople.
    These are just some of the articles that give the public a different view. They can have a closed mind and take it as propaganda or have an open mind and maybe find what they have always suspected.
    http://www.prisonplanet.com/people-who-opposed-the-bailout-are-not-to-blame-for-the-stock-market-crash.html
    http://www.prisonplanet.com/the-near-death-of-the-state.html
    http://www.prisonplanet.com/ammunition-to-use-against-the-new-improved-bailout-proposal.html
    http://www.prisonplanet.com/silver-lining-of-the-economic-crash-a-window-of-opportunity-to-plant-seeds-of-truth.html
    I think this is a great solution from one commenter:
    “1. no bailout. If they want to help the economy, give each citizen 1 million dollars and they will get the economy back up and running. This would be cheeper then 700 billion dollars.”
    The human spirit is strong, creative and wise. We have to learn to trust our internal voice.

  4. Glenn says:

    Truth and Reconciliation.
    This has not been identified as what it truly is – Financial “Coup de Grâce “. The end result, is if the nation does not take decisive action, we will see an absolute OGOLOPILY. It appears that if Wall Street is left to muddle through, we will have 3-5 major operators controlling our Nations economy.
    Ron, I agree with you whole heartily. I also believe that we need a commission to truly examine, try, and convict all the operatives that have effectively raped all of us. South Africa has instituted for the last decade or so a process where upon people guilty of Apatite crimes, come forward and admit to their actions and are willing to make amends, may be legally forgiven.
    I say go forward carefully with the “Bail-out”, reinstate the Up tic rule, recall the bad deregulation laws passed in the last 20 years, reinvigorate the regulatory authorities and study this situation as if our Nation’s Life were on the line, because it is.
    For the Democrats, Stop acting like Republicans! For the Republicans, Stop with this “Free Market Fantasy” without regulations everything will fall into Anarchy. Freeways without rules are a parking lot. A boxing match without rules is just a brawl. A Banking/Credit/Investment system without rules creates economies like Mexico or India. We need you as a checks and balance’s system, but, you need to become Republicans again, remember: small government, Physical Responsibility, Balanced Budgets.
    We NEED all of these players to come forward, explain what they have done and how they have “Gamed The System”, be willing to make financial amends. Without all of this information we are just perpetuating the problem and rewarding the same system. If they don’t then they need to be prosecuted and convicted.
    If we are unable or unwilling to learn from this situation our economy will be ruined permanently. These players: Paulson, Bernanke, Bush, Cheney, Dodd, Franks, Boaner and Polosi. All of them are complicit if not actual players. We are NOT suffering from a crisis of credit we are suffering “A Crisis Of Credibility”. If we are never able to trust our government again we are doomed as a nation.
    Glenn

  5. Anonymous says:

    These are just some of the articles that give the public a different view…
    With all due respect to your links to prinsonplanet.com (the web home of talkradio host / conspiracy theorist Alex Jones), I just can’t embrace the rantings of a guy who:
    1) Is a leading voice in the so-called “9/11 Truth Movement” that believes U.S. government insiders were complicit in the terrorist attackes on the World Trade Center;
    2) Has asserted that during the Branch Davidian standoff in Waco, federal agents with breathing gear went in to kill the people inside so there would be no witnesses to the truth of how that standoff really began;
    3) Has asserted that the Federal Emergency Management Agency is building hundreds of concentration camps on military bases;
    4) Fervently believes in the “New World Order” conspiracy, which frames just about every major global occurrence as part of a massive conspiracy by powerful and secretive groups to eventually rule the world via an autonomous world government.
    To the extent some of y’all see black helicopters behind the current financial crisis, sorry, you’re too far out on the fringe for me. I can see you out there on the horizon, the sun glinting off your tinfoil hats, but I can’t reach you (and don’t really care to)…

  6. Anonymous says:

    There was good reason to wait and not sign that bill — e.g., to limit CEO compensation. One of the biggest outrages is that those who created this mess still get their “golden parachutes” and leave rich, instead of in jail. The new proposed limits are $500,000 — still way more than they deserve.
    To discourage people pulling their money out of banks, there’s talk of FDIC protection upto $250,000 instead of a mere $100,000.
    Plus the taxpayers are now supposed to get back some payola if the financial institutions see a profit, making us more investors than just suckers. It’s infuriating to listen to the liberal Democrats like Maxine Waters and every black and Latino insisting, as recently as a year ago, that Fannie Mae and Mac were sound and efforts to regulate them or reign them in were aimed at people of color and the poor — among the biggest beneficiaries of these loans. (Not that I’m holding my breath about seeing any returns on our “investment.” Personally, I’d rather split up that $700 billion between all adult taxpayers, with more going to taxpayers who’ve paid into the system longer — now that would be a real boost to the economy.)

  7. Anonymous says:

    Celeste Fremon in WitnessLA blog has an extensive excerpt from Brad Sherman on why he voted no — read it before jumping to wild conclusions about him, or who was “right and wrong.”
    Among his objections are that the bill would have done nothing to curb million dollar/month CEO compensations; would have bailed out foreign investors as well as American institutions; would have done nothing for individual mortgage holders about to lose their homes (there’s now talk of giving courts some say in debt forgiveness — though if someone’s losing their home, to do they have time and money to go to court?) or forgiving some % of a loan provided the person can meet the borrowing qualifcations, etc. I don’t know Sherman and don’t live in his Valley district, but he makes some valid points — haste can make waste, to use the old cliche. Your IRA and pensions aren’t going to be significantly worse in a few days, Ron, while the consequences of a bad “agreement” will live with us for decades. This $700 billion (where’d they get that figure?) would have paid for universal healthcare for 6 years, exceeds the cost of the Iraq/Afghan wars, could have paid for Katrina recovery many times over… and yet the homeowners in crisis and those with money in the bank wouldn’t have benefited, nor would the taxpayers have seen any return in investment should the financial institutions turn around.
    Sounds to me like we can thank the cautious ones — although Republicans and Democrats voted against the bill for opposite reasons (the Democrats including ones you name on above thread, because they want MORE money and debt forgiveness to go directly to their poor constituents, the very ones who should never have borrowed or gotten mortgages, and did so purely on speculation that when their balloons came due their property values would have increased enough to take the money out of the home’s equity. THAT is the only part the banks, real estate industry etc. are responsible for — virtually assuring buyers on the edge that that would happen.)

  8. anonymous says:

    Response to ll:43
    I agree with you Alex Jones rants, that’s his style, and is easy to brush off his message because of it. Yes, his messages are quite irreverent to the government. Who could conceive that the U. S. government insiders were complicit in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center? It is an outrage that someone can say that and yet there are a growing number of people that once they see the proof they believe it. This proof has not come from the madness of Alex Jones mind. It has come from Air Pilots, First Responders, Scientists, and many other sources that have compiled the information of what happened that terrible day. Yes, it is an atrocity and very difficult to accept that one’s own government is involved in it. It is easier to brush it of as the rants of a crazy man.
    Alex Jones is not the only source for this knowledge, there are many other sources.
    “All truth goes through three stages. First it is ridiculed. Then it is violently opposed. Finally it is accepted as self-evident.”
    Schoepenhouer

  9. Anonymous says:

    I’m more of a Hegel man: “Truth in philosophy means that concept and external reality correspond.”

  10. Anonymous says:

    Rep. Sherman appeared petty, shrill and oh so small during the wee hours on the floor of House, a half-night’s sleep before the failed vote. His capable neighbor, Rep. David Dreier, who supported the bill with other serious members, acted the patient adult, politely correcting Sherman’s suburban faux popularism wrapped around economic ignorance, as the sole GOP rep on the floor in the late night/early morning session debating the bill. And then, Brad voted against the thing, ugly as it was, proving his economic illiteracy beyond doubt. A yellow dog yapping on the back bench.

  11. Mark97 says:

    Mechanisms of language acquisition. ,

  12. Mark97 says:

    Mechanisms of language acquisition. ,

  13. toys says:

    Excellent job.

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